Exemplars in Vaccine Delivery: Key Lessons in Addressing Facility Readiness, Vaccine Hesitancy, and Community Access

May 17, 2022

The Exemplars in Global Health (EGH) program believes that the quickest path to success is to identify who has already been successful, find out what drove their success, and learn how to adapt those strategies to different circumstances. EGH aims to help guide public health decision-makers around the world through this process. In this session, you will hear from the EGH team, including the Senegal in-country research principal investigator, Dr. Moussa Sarr, on the key drivers of success in addressing vaccine delivery challenges in the three Vaccine Delivery Exemplar countries: Senegal, Zambia, and Nepal. The team will share lessons on how these countries emerged as positive outliers in the field and discuss emerging themes and lessons learned.

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