New Spatial Study Helps Identify Where to Improve Vaccine Delivery in Africa

While many African nations have made substantial progress in vaccinating children against life-threatening diseases, wide discrepancies remain within countries, according to a new scientific study conducted by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington. The spatial and temporal modelling study, Mapping diphtheria-pertussis-tetanus vaccine coverage in Africa, 2000-2016: a spatial and temporal modelling study, found that the proportion of children receiving the full infant series of three vaccinations against diphtheria, pertussis and tetanus (DPT3) increased in almost three quarters of districts in Africa between 2000 and 2016. In 29 of 52 nations studied, however, coverage with DPT3 varied by more than 25% at the district level, highlighting substantial variation within countries.  The study maps nations in fine-scale, 5×5 kilometer increments in this interactive data visualization, so that health officials nationally and locally can identify gaps in vaccine coverage and target interventions with precision, tailoring health policy decisions at local levels.

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